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DEBATE: Who's winning in Yemen's war?

At an event organised by SOAS Yemen Society in collaboration with LSE Middle East Society, Nawal Al-Maghafi, Mohammed Alyahya, Baraa Shiban and Awssan Kamal discuss the conflict in Yemen
Yemen in crisis event poster (Facebook/ Yemen Society SOAS)
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Seven months after the Saudi-led air campaign against Houthi militias began on 26 March, the war in Yemen has taken a terrible toll on the Arab world's poorest nation, with both sides accused of committing war crimes.

The country is experiencing "a humanitarian catastrophe". That was the frank assessment of the UN's humanitarian co-ordinator Johannes Van Der Klaauw on 19 August.

As in many conflicts, civilians caught in the middle have had to bear the brunt of the cost, with thousands falling victim to indiscriminate targeting - whether from coalition airstrikes or heavy weaponry shelling by the Houthis. While estimates vary, many believe the death toll during the first seven months of the coalition campaign has already surpassed the 5,000 mark.

The destruction of infrastructure and restrictions on imports imposed by a Saudi-led coalition carrying out airstrikes against the rebels have led to 21 million people being deprived of life-sustaining commodities and basic services.

In a talk organised by SOAS Yemen Society in collaboration with LSE Middle East Society at King's College London, MEEs Nawal Al-Maghafi, Mohammed Alyahya, Baraa Shiban and Awssan Kamal discuss who is winning the conflict.

"Saudi Arabia is trying to avoid another Somalia at the south of its border." Mohammed Alyahya 

"With every airstrike you're helping the Houthis recruit." Nawal Al-Maghafi

"We went to the national dialogue with high hopes." Baraa Shaiban

"Yemenis don't want to be buried." Awssan Kamal