Skip to main content

Knesset approves extra $950mn for Israeli army

The Knesset's decision to divert hundreds of millions from the civilian welfare budget to the army has caused upset in some quarters
The latest Israeli offensive against Gaza has already cost the Israeli army between $1.2 billion and $2.3 billion

Israel's Knesset (parliament) on Tuesday approved the reallocation of some $950 million from the country's civilian welfare budget to the army, Israeli Radio has reported.

According to the broadcaster, the assembly's finance committee agreed to give the army 3.3 billion Israeli shekels (roughly $950 million) previously earmarked for the upgrade of public transport and water facilities, among other things.

It added that opposition lawmaker Stav Shafir had been removed from the parliamentary session due to opposition to the move.

MP Zehava Galon of the Meretz Party, for her part, criticized the government's failure to provide an explanation.

She said the committee could not reallocate billions of shekels without providing an adequate explanation.

According to the Times of Israel newspaper, the recent military offensive against the blockaded Gaza Strip has cost the Israeli army between $1.2 billion and $2.3 billion.

At least 1,944 Palestinians, mostly civilians, have been killed – and 9,886 others injured, many critically – in devastating Israeli attacks since July 7.

Over the same period, thousands of homes in Gaza have been flattened by unrelenting Israeli bombardments.

Three Israeli civilians have been killed by Palestinian rocket fire since hostilities began early last month, according to official Israeli figures, while at least 64 Israeli soldiers have been killed in battles with Palestinian fighters inside the embattled Gaza Strip.

Palestinian and Israeli negotiating teams are currently in Cairo for indirect talks aimed at hammering out a permanent ceasefire.

A three-day truce, brokered by Egypt, is set to expire on Tuesday.

Middle East Eye delivers independent and unrivalled coverage and analysis of the Middle East, North Africa and beyond. To learn more about republishing this content and the associated fees, please fill out this form. More about MEE can be found here.