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Muslim world unites to condemn Medina suicide attacks

Middle East leaders, journalists and ordinary Muslims take to social media to condemn attack on one of Islam's holiest site
Saudi Emir of Medina Prince Faisal bin Salman bin Abdulaziz visits an injured policeman at a local hospital following a suicide attack near the security headquarters of the Prophet's Mosque in Medina City on 4 July 2016. (AFP)

World leaders, journalists and ordinary Muslims joined together on Tuesday to condemn the suicide attacks that took place near the prophet's mosque in Medina, the second most holiest site for Muslims. 

The attacks have garnered condemnation from Sunni and Shia leaders globally, as news emerged of the attacks killing four security guards close to the Prophet's mosque where thousands had gathered to pray and mark the last few days of Ramadhan.  

Arabs took to  Twitter to express their shock at the attacks using the hashtag "ISIS violates mosque and tomb of the prophet".

Saudi Arabia was also rocked by other suicide attacks in Jeddah and Qatif. 

A spokesman for Saudi Arabia's interior ministry described the triple bombings as "despicable acts that did not respect the sanctity of place, time and innocent people".

Muslim leaders from around the world condemned the attacks:

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif condemned the suicide bombing in Medina and called for Muslim unity.

King Abdullah of Jordan condemned the attacks in a statement via the kingdom's official Twitter account. 

Qatar's foreign minister Prince Tamin bin Hamad al-Thani showed solidarity with his Saudi neighbours and dubbed the attacks as "unacceptable". 

Arab Journalist Jenan Moussa's tweet went viral as it captured for many Muslims the symbolic importance of the city of Medina. 

Many Arab commentators also took to Twitter to use the Medina attacks to highlight that Muslims make up the majority of victims in terror attacks globally.